CHARLES TAYLOR JUNIOR

“Steam and Sail Ship off Ascension Island”
Watercolour 15.1/2" x 23" (SOLD)

Charles Taylor Junior exhibited work mostly from 1841-1883 and was the son of Charles Taylor Senior (1836 -1871).
Charles Junior lived at Scarsdale terrace, Kensington and Gloucester Place, Camden Town. Much of his work was tidal and estuary scenes, often showing shipping on the Thames, always in the medium of watercolour. He had great success exhibiting at The Royal Academy between 1846 and 1849, but his main body of work was shown at The Royal Institute of Watercolour Painters between 1843 and 1866. Some examples of his paintings can be seen in The Maritime Museum at Greenwich.

This painting is so typical and one of his best. Taylor was brilliant at capturing the plight of ships at the mercy of an angry sea and a favoured feature for marine-subject lovers is the mix in a painting of sail and steam, which is shown so well here. Paddle steamers such as this were often used as passenger carriers, so it is likely that this ship approaching Ascension Island in the mid-Atlantic, whilst carrying some cargo and mail, was also ferrying people who were some of the later short-term settlers and workers whose task was the continued taming and nurturing of this few square miles of primarily barren and hostile volcanic rock.

CHARLES TAYLOR JUNIOR

“Steam and Sail Ship off Ascension Island”
Watercolour 15.1/2" x 23" (SOLD)

Charles Taylor Junior exhibited work mostly from 1841-1883 and was the son of Charles Taylor Senior (1836 -1871).
Charles Junior lived at Scarsdale terrace, Kensington and Gloucester Place, Camden Town. Much of his work was tidal and estuary scenes, often showing shipping on the Thames, always in the medium of watercolour. He had great success exhibiting at The Royal Academy between 1846 and 1849, but his main body of work was shown at The Royal Institute of Watercolour Painters between 1843 and 1866. Some examples of his paintings can be seen in The Maritime Museum at Greenwich.

This painting is so typical and one of his best. Taylor was brilliant at capturing the plight of ships at the mercy of an angry sea and a favoured feature for marine-subject lovers is the mix in a painting of sail and steam, which is shown so well here. Paddle steamers such as this were often used as passenger carriers, so it is likely that this ship approaching Ascension Island in the mid-Atlantic, whilst carrying some cargo and mail, was also ferrying people who were some of the later short-term settlers and workers whose task was the continued taming and nurturing of this few square miles of primarily barren and hostile volcanic rock.